Analysis

Major developments - whether they be new roads or ports, or new open cut coal mines - can have serious impacts on our environment.  Fortunately, nationally important environmental features, like the Great Barrier Reef, or nationally threatened species, are protected by Federal environmental laws, and the Federal government assesses major projects to ensure that they don't destroy or significant

Scale matters.  It's logical and appropriate that our national government ought to have responsibility for matters that are of national environmental significance.

The States have a very poor record on establishing good environmental laws and administering the environmental laws that they do have. There are environmental protection laws on the State books that they don’t even use.

Welcome to our blog series '10 Reasons why responsibility for national environmental laws ought not be transferred to the States'

Image of books from library

Yesterday, the Victorian Government made the long-awaited appointment of the Freedom of Information (FOI) Commissioner.

On 24 October, the Victorian Auditor-General reported on the ‘effectiveness of compliance activities’ of the two main departments charged with administering environmental legislation in Victoria, the Department of Sustainability and Environment and the Depar

The EDO has made a submission to a Review on native vegetation regulation being undertaken by the Victorian Government. The Government has put forward a range of reform proposals in a recent Consultation Paper on the subject.

The Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal has handed down its decision in Lisa Caripis v Victoria Police, an important case about protesters and their rights to privacy.  

The EDO acted for Lisa Caripis, a researcher and writer on climate change law, who had been filmed by Police attending a peaceful protest.

Good planning should be based on community consultation, expert advice and accountability and transparency.

Last week, Minister for Planning, Matthew Guy MP, made a last-minute, political decision to avoid proper planning processes that is completely contrary to principles of good planning.

The Environment Defenders Office is representing a small environment group, Friends of the Surry, in an upcoming VCAT hearing on 8 October.  The case is about protecting our coast from bad planning decisions.

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